NC Leads Nation in Board Certified Teachers (DPI)

The image “https://i1.wp.com/www.temple.edu/education/CTE/images/nbptslogo.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. From a DPI Press release:

RALEIGH – Gov. Mike Easley announced today that North Carolina leads the nation in the number of teachers who have earned certification by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards. With 12,770 teachers across the state now certified, nearly 15 percent of North Carolina teachers have achieved National Board certification.

“We are proud that more than one-fifth of the nation’s 64,000 National Board Certified teachers work in North Carolina classrooms,” Easley said. “Our state supports and applauds these educators who are crucial to our efforts to prepare students for college, a career and success in the 21st century.”

While North Carolina is the number one state in the national certification, Wake County ranks 2nd among all school districts in the nation for its number of National Board Certified teachers (1,259) and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools ranks 4th with 1,049 teachers who have earned the certification. Four North Carolina counties ranked in the nation’s top 20 in the number of teachers receiving certification in 2007: Wake was 4th with 165; Charlotte Mecklenburg, 5th with 162; Guilford, 14th with 61; and New Hanover, 20th with 42.

National Board Certification, the highest credential in the teaching profession, requires an extensive series of performance-based assessments including teaching portfolios, student work samples, videotapes and thorough analyses of the candidates’ classroom teaching and student learning. Teachers also complete a series of written exercises that probe the depth of their subject-matter knowledge, as well as their understanding of how to teach those subjects to their students.

North Carolina supports teachers’ efforts to achieve National Board Certification in the following ways:
* Payment up front of the $2,500 assessment fee. (Teachers are obligated to teach in the state the following year whether or not they achieve certification.)
* Three paid release days from normal teacher responsibilities to develop their portfolios.
* A 12-percent salary supplement to the teachers’ regular salary, good for the 10-year life of the certification.
* 15 continuing education units (CEUs) awarded to the individual for completing the National Board Certification process. Also, the State Board of Education awards a North Carolina teaching license to out-of-state teachers who possess National Board Certification.

North Carolina has led the nation in the number of nationally board certified teachers since 1994. The other states in the top 5 ranking are Florida, 10,875; South Carolina, 5,729; California, 3,878; Ohio, 2,757.

In addition to supporting the National Board certification process, Easley has worked with the N.C. General Assembly to dramatically increase salaries for all teachers in North Carolina, including a five percent raise for this school year. This year¹s state budget also included $70 million for ABC bonuses and $37.5 million to continue class size reduction in the lower grades so teachers and their students can focus more on learning.

In 2002, Easley launched the first-in-the-nation Teacher Working Conditions Survey, which provides detailed information at the school, district and state level on teacher perceptions of leadership, professional development, materials and resources, and other conditions of work that have an impact on teacher retention and student achievement. The survey will be implemented again in March 2008.

For more information on National Board Certification, go to www.nbpts.org.

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E.C. 🙂

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