Who’s the REAL “progressive” candidate?

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I had to laugh out loud when I read this in this past Friday’s Rhino Times:

…[Dot] Kearns, a Democrat who has held political office since 1972, including a seat on the school board, the Guilford County Board of Commissioners and the former High Point school board, said that, although she is not formally endorsing a potential replacement, she supports [Michael] McKinney.

http://www.gcsnc.com/images/kearns1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. “I am going to vote for Mike McKinney,” Kearns said. “I think we need geographic representation, and he’s from High Point, and I think he’s a very qualified candidate. He seems to me to be a very progressive candidate. He favors the passage of school bonds, which some of the other candidates do not.”

Kearns said McKinney has lived and been active in both Greensboro and High Point. “I think people know him in both cities and have a good opinion of him,” she said.

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Two things to break down here…let’s go back to this Kearns quote:

“I think we need geographic representation, and he’s from High Point…”

Yes, we need geographic representation, yes, McKinney’s from High Point…but remember, the at-large seat is COUNTYWIDE! That means representing children in High Point…and elsewhere in Guilford County.

Another:

“…He seems to me to be a very progressive candidate. He favors the passage of school bonds, which some of the other candidates do not.”

So…supporting the bond issue makes a candidate progressive? No.

Taking a public stand on issues affecting our children makes a candidate progressive. And my campaign has been doing just that since December, 2006.

So when you cast your ballot next Tuesday, remember who the real progressive candidate is in this race.

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E.C. )

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13 Responses

  1. It is no surprise that Dot Kearns views the At-Large member as a geographical position. That’s exactly how she has handled the position for years. Go back and review her past comments, and you’ll see that her focus was always on High Point, not the entire county. It’s true that High Point has had three board members for many years, so Dot wants it to continue, as a right of High Point for supporting the school merger a decade ago. As they all say, High Point is different than Greensboro. I suppose that Jeremiah Wright would say “different, not deficient”.

  2. Eric,

    I’m trying to decide for whom to cast my vote in this race. You have a lot going for you, but can you tell us what you think of racial integration in the schools and how your opinion might manifest itself in your decisions should you be elected?

  3. I appreciate your willingness to do your homework on all the candidates, Roch. That said, I believe all of our schools should be integrated and I believe in strong diversity in our schools. But I also believe in natural integration in neighborhood schools, not forced busing. We have magnet programs that can aid in this effort, but our magnets can be strengthened at all levels; they’re not working to their full potential. I hope this helps and I hope I’ve earned your vote.

  4. Thanks for the reply, Eric. I’d just like to make sure I’m clear. If you could, you would do away with busing altogether as a means of achieving racial integration?

  5. You are correct. I’m in favor of children attending their closest neighborhood school.

    Too many children are being bused all over this county, daily. And with diesel fuel at an all-time high, it is senseless. To that end, I’m also in favor of ensuring ALL of our schools have access to the necessary supplies, resources and manpower for them to succeed so that our children can succeed. Social experimentation on our children is wrong. It failed in High Point. It continues to fail countywide.

    I’m not sure if this is the answer you were looking for, but I feel very strongly that neighborhood schools are the anchor for every neighborhood and community, and must be treated as such. Our neighborhoods and communities must embrace these schools and embrace these children and do all they can to help these children succeed.

  6. Again, thank you for the quick and direct answer–that’s one of the things you have going for you, in my opinion.

    Don’t you think however, that this, “I’m in favor of children attending their closest neighborhood school,” would result in a de facto segregation of our schools?

  7. To a typical person, it may have that connotation, but I know I wouldn’t want a governmental body telling me that I have to send my child to another school across town to achieve a racial balance when I live across the street from a “neighborhood school.”

    That’s the main problem I have. That’s the main problem many High Point families have had to endure over the past few years.

    We can (and must) get to the point where we can put every resource, every supply, every employee imaginable into ALL of our schools, and when we get to that point (because we’re not there yet under this current Board), I think achievement levels and graduation rates will go up. But there are disparities in the current system and that concerns me.

  8. roch are you kidding me about a decision in this race the only candidate is Eric, but if you want to go for the TREBIC CARTEL annointed one then go vote for McKinney but if you want a person who can do the job than you know who I will be voting for and I hope you do too.

  9. Thanks again for keeping the dialog going. I’m really trying to get a handle on the consequences of you being elected to the school board, currently seeing many positives, but wanting to alleviate some concerns. Thus, I wonder if you would try again to answer my previous question, that I don’t think you addresses head on: Would having children attend only the school closest to them, given the demographics of Guilford County, result in racial segregation of our schools?

  10. Roch, the consequences of me being elected will result in us finally having an accountable and transparent school board that (hopefully) puts children first over partisan, personal and social agendas.

    I don’t see anything wrong with children attending their closest school. The irony, Roch, is that both Deena and Walt (both longtime busing advocates) recently said collectively that we bus too many children in this county. If it is a school without an attractive magnet program, it may seem like segregation to some. But whether or not any school sits in a neighborhood where one race or culture is dominant, it is immaterial.

    That school should be allowed to succeed and those children attending that school should be able to properly tap into those resources going into that school. The energy, time and money spent busing kids between Southwest H.S. and Andrews H.S. could have been better utilized into putting resources into both schools.

    I guess I don’t buy into the argument that black children learn better when sitting next to white children. Black children can learn sitting next to other black children. Just like white children can learn sitting next to other white children.

    The state standards are the same. The curriculum is the same. The textbooks are the same. The testing is the same.

    It all has to do with resources and manpower and supplies and what’s being poured into these schools (or more importantly, what’s NOT).

  11. It was direct question. I’m not going to ask it a third time. Your unwillingness to provide a direct answer is enough. Sorry.

  12. Roch, with all due respect…it has been asked and answered.

    Do I think neighborhood schools amount to de-facto segregation? With good magnet programs that work to their full potential, the answer is no. I’m not sure what answer you’re looking for, but I’m not in favor of busing our children, point blank.

    If you’re looking to support Michael McKinney, as he is a High Pointer, please ask him where he stands on busing. I’d like to know as well, because it will be a campaign issue over the summer and fall. He’s the parent of a child (or children) in the Southwest area schools. He supports diversity in schools (as I do), but where was he when many of his neighbor’s children were being bused? What was his stance then, and is it the same stance now?

  13. “Do I think neighborhood schools amount to de-facto segregation? With good magnet programs that work to their full potential, the answer is no.”

    Okay. Now that is an answer. Thank you.

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